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Extractive Industry Work Plan Guideline

Extractive Industry Work Plan Guideline

Download the PDF version of this document: Extractive Industry Work Plan Guideline

Contents

Part 1

Introduction – purpose and structure of this guideline

Part 2

How the work plan fits into the Earth Resources approval process

Part 3

What does a work plan need to include?

  1. Geological information (Clause 1)
  2. General location plan (Clause 2)
  3. Regional plan (Clause 3)
  4. Site plans (Clause 4)
  5. Processing methods (Clause 5)
  6. Stability requirements for declared quarries (Clause 6)
  7. Environmental management program (Clause 7)
  8. Rehabilitation plan (Clause 8)
  9. Community facilities affected (Clause 9)
  10. Community engagement plan (Clause 10)

Part 4

Work plan variations

Appendices

Appendix 1      The work authority application process
Appendix 2      Earth Resources contact details
Appendix 3.1   Schedule 1 of the Regulations
Appendix 3.2   Example of a general location plan
Appendix 3.3   Example of a regional plan
Appendix 3.4   Example of a site plan and cross sections
Appendix 3.5   Example of an environmental monitoring schedule
Appendix 3.6   Example of a rehabilitation plan
Appendix 4      Glossary of terms
Appendix 5      Example of a work plan structure
Appendix 6      Work plan checklist
Appendix 7      Additional resources

Part 1: Introduction – purpose and structure of this guideline

A work plan can be a legal requirement for an extractive industry under the Mineral Resources (Sustainable Development) Act 1990 (‘the Act’).

Part 1 of Schedule 1 of the Mineral Resources (Sustainable Development) (Extractive Industries) Regulations 2010 (‘the Regulations’) say what must be included in a work plan.

The purpose of this guideline is to assist proponents of extractive industries to prepare a work plan. The guideline has no formal legal status or effect. It is intended to guide proponents as to what Earth Resources regards to be compliant with the Act and Regulations.

This guideline covers:

  • How the work plan fits into the Earth Resources approval process (including who needs to apply for a work authority).
  • Who needs to prepare a draft work plan.
  • What a work plan needs to include.
  • When a work plan variation is required.

This guideline is structured around the following Parts:

  • Part 1 Introduction.
  • Part 2 How the work plan fits into the Earth Resources approval process.
  • Part 3 What a work plan needs to include.
  • Part 4 Work plan variations.

All documents and resources referred to in this guideline are listed in Appendix 7, along with their web site location (current at the time of publication of this guideline).

Appendix 5 provides an example of the way that a work plan could be structured. A work plan does not have to be structured in this way.

Appendix 6 provides a checklist of the requirements in Schedule 1 of the Regulations. This is the information that must, legally, be included in a work plan.

The guideline attempts to distinguish between legal requirements (in the Act and Regulations), by using words such as ‘must’ and ‘required’, and guidance, by using words such as ‘should’ and ‘recommended’. If it is not clear what is a legal requirement and what is guidance, please contact your local Earth Resources  office (see Appendix 2 for contact details).

Throughout this document, sections of the Regulations are duplicated. These are current at the time of publication. Check the Victorian Government legislation website for the current Regulations, as these Regulations take precedence.

This guideline replaces previous work plan guidance material (previously called G3 and G4).

Part 2: How the work plan fits into the Earth Resources  approval process

Operators of quarries on land covering an area of one hectare or greater, and or at a depth of two metres or deeper, must hold a work authority under the Act.1 A work authority can be obtained by application to Earth Resources.

If the proposed quarry is less than one hectare in area and less than two metres in depth, a work authority, and therefore a work plan is not required.

If a work authority is required, a work plan may need to be prepared and approved before the work authority can be granted. A work plan is not required if the proposed extractive industry:

  • Is on land that has an area of less than five hectares.
  • Has a depth less than five metres.
  • Does not require blasting, and
  • Does not require clearing of native vegetation.

If a work plan is not required, the site must comply with the Code of Practice for Small Quarries.

The work authority application process has two stages: determining if a work plan is needed and gaining an approved work plan (stage 1) and applying for a work authority (stage 2). The flow diagram in Appendix 1 shows this two stage process.

The first stage requires proponents to:

  • Seek and obtain approval in principle from the land owner or land manager for access to the land.
  • Contact the local Earth Resources Regulation District Office and discuss the proposal with the District Manager, or representative (refer to Appendix 2 – Earth Resources Contact Details).
  • Hold an on-site meeting with representatives of the relevant government departments and authorities. Earth Resources can provide advice on which agencies are required. As a guide, they may include: the Environment Protection Authority (EPA); the relevant water authority; local government; Aboriginal Affairs Victoria (AAV) and the Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI).
  • Determine whether or not a work plan is necessary (based on the criteria listed above) and if so prepare a draft work plan for the proposal.
  • Obtain the Earth Resources's  endorsement of the draft work plan. This involves referral of the draft work plan to other government departments and authorities by the DSDBI.
  • Submit the endorsed work plan to Council with a planning permit application.

Once the planning permit is obtained, Earth Resources  can approve the work plan.

Within one month of the endorsed work plan or application for a work plan variation being lodged with Earth Resources, the Department Head or delegate will do one of the following:

  • Approve the work plan or variation (with or without conditions).
  • Ask for the work plan or variation to be changed before it will be approved or
  • Refuse to approve the plan or variation.
  • The second stage of the application process requires proponents to lodge the work authority application with the approved work plan.

The broader approvals process

Refer to the Victorian Planning Provision Practice Note: Extractive Industry Proposals for information about local government planning permit requirements.

The Act and the Regulations can be downloaded from the following web site:
http://www.legislation.vic.gov.au

Part 3: What does a work plan need to include?

How this part is structured

A work plan must contain the information set out in Part 1 of Schedule 1 of the Regulations (clauses 1 to 10). This is a legal requirement. These requirements are in the text boxes below.

Level of detail

The level of detail and content of a work plan will vary from site to site and depend on the size and complexity of the extractive industry operation.

The level of detail included in the examples in the appendices may be greater or less than that required in the work plan for a particular site.

Plans

Work plans will include text and plans. ‘Plans’ means pictorial representations such as drawings and maps, including aerial photographs. All plans should have these features: north direction; legend; scale; and drawing and revision dates.

Supporting specialist reports

Specialist reports should be included in full in appendices to the work plan if they have been required in the preparation of the work plan. A summary of each report should be included in the relevant section of the work plan text.

GeoVic mapping tool

GeoVic is a publicly available web-based mapping tool that accesses Earth Resources's geospatial database. GeoVic may be of assistance in preparing some of the plans that are required in a work plan.

1. Geological information

Clause 1

A general description of the geological information of the location including estimates of stone resources.

 

A general description of geological information is required. At a minimum, proponents should provide:

  • Information about the type of stone to be extracted. For example: hard rock, sand and gravel, clay, limestone, scoria/ tuff, or other (specify) and a general description of the geology of the site.
  • Whether any test work has been undertaken and, if so, a brief description of the material and the depth of the resource.
  • The total estimated reserves in tonnes or cubic metres.
  • A statement about the quality and anticipated uses of the stone resource.

Where relevant, the following information should also be included:

  • Estimates of quantities of top soil and overburden to be removed.
  • Details of the methods of investigation, sampling and sample testing. For example diamond drilling, percussion drilling, conductivity tests, grab samples.
  • Maps and geological cross-sections, showing geological and quality boundaries, sample locations and any other test results.

Multi-bench sites greater than thirty metres deep should also include information about the proposed geotechnical regime, including an assessment of slope stability and measures proposed for management or monitoring of slope stability.

Information about potential reserves may be provided.

2. General location plan

Clause 2

A general location plan at a scale of 1:100 000 or 1:50 000.

 

Proponents must include a map that shows the location of the proposed quarry at a scale of 1:100,000 or 1:50,000.

The map should show surrounding residential settlement and enable the reader to clearly locate the quarry site and show nearby towns or suburbs.

An example of a general location plan is included in Appendix 3.2.

3. Regional plan

Clause 3

A regional plan at a scale of 1:25 000 showing the extent of Crown lands, private lands, private land allotments, rivers and streams within the proposed work plan area and, where possible, parks and reserves within two kilometres of the site. Copies of certificates of title must also be submitted with respect to any private land allotments.

 

Proponents must include a 1: 25,000 scale regional plan which shows privately owned land, Crown land, rivers and streams within the work plan area.

Where possible the plan must show parks and reserves within 2 kilometres (km) from the site.

The plan should also include proposed access roads and occupied houses within 2 km of the site.

The significant community facilities that may be affected by the proposal should also be depicted on the regional plan. Refer to clause 9 for information about this requirement.

An example of a regional plan (which does not include all of the above features) is included in Appendix 3.3.

Proponents must include certificates of title for privately owned land within the proposed work authority area. These certificates may be included in an appendix to the work plan.

Proponents must include a site plan(s) in their work plan.

4. Site plans

Clause 4

A site plan at an appropriate scale including cross-sections, showing and describing existing surface contours and topographical features, drainage patterns, water courses, vegetation features and soil information and also including the following –

  1. the surface facilities including the proposed location of buildings and the location of crushing, screening and other processing plant;
  2. the anticipated extent of extraction with proposed bench heights, berm details and working batters;
  3. the sequencing of extraction;
  4. the location of topsoil and waste rock dumps and stockpile areas;
  5. the location of proposed water dams, any slimes dams and sediment retention systems and any measures for the diversion of water from the site;
  6. access roads.

 

The scale of the plans will depend on the size of the site and must identify the features listed under clause 4. Commonly used scales for site plans are 1:1,000 or 1:2,500. It may be necessary to include a number of plans to meet this requirement.

Site plans should contain an Australian Map Grid (AMG) reference and the geodetic datum used.

Proponents must include cross-sections. The number of cross-sections will depend on the complexity of the site. The location of the cross-sections should be selected to enable the reader to gauge the depth and proposed extraction profile. If groundwater will be intersected, the ground water level should be shown on the cross-section.

The location of cross-sections is shown on the site plan (marked A – A’ for example). Cross-sections are generally oriented at right angles to the extraction face.

What should be included in the site plans?

Proponents should carefully read clause 4 above, as all of these features, where they exist on site, must be shown on the site plans.

With regard to clause 4(c), the sequencing of extraction, this should be planned in conjunction with the rehabilitation plan requirements (clause 8). Where the site plan shows sequencing of extraction, progressive rehabilitation should also be shown. Progressive rehabilitation means rehabilitation of an extracted area while extraction moves to another area.

Sequencing of extraction should also be planned so that terminal faces can be rehabilitated as early in the quarry life as possible.

The following features should also be included in the site plans where they are relevant:

  • Other infrastructure, such as a weighbridge
  • Boundary of the work authority area
  • Buffer zones and any acoustic or visibility reduction bunds
  • Groundwater boreholes
  • Contours
  • Locations of drill sample holes
  • Utility supply (power lines, gas water supply)
  • Fences
  • Native vegetation to be preserved and approved for clearing
  • Environmental monitoring locations
  • Fuel and other hydrocarbon storage.
  • An example of a site plan (which does not include all of the above features) is included in Appendix 3.4.

5. Processing methods

Clause 5

Description of processing methods to be used including the proposed plant layout.

 

The proponent must describe how the stone will be processed within the work authority area and the proposed layout of the processing plant. The following structures should be mentioned if they are present on site:

  • Power supply
  • Fuel storage
  • Water supply
  • Weighbridge
  • Laboratories
  • Workshops
  • Office.

Note that the location of surface facilities is shown on the site plan (clause 4).

6. Stability requirements for declared quarries

Clause 6

If the general location plan includes a declared quarry, the quarry stability requirements set out in Part 2 [of Schedule 1 of the Regulations].

 

A proposed or existing quarry can be ‘declared’ by the Minister if there are geotechnical or hydrogeological factors within the quarry that pose a significant risk to public safety, the environment or infrastructure.

Sites that have not been declared by the Minister are not required to satisfy these requirements.

Work plans for declared quarries are required to include additional information. Refer to Part 2 of Schedule 1 in Appendix 3.1 for these requirements.

Earth Resources  is currently preparing a guideline on stability of mines and quarries which will assist in meeting the requirements of Part 2 of Schedule 1 of the Regulations. Refer to the Energy and Earth Resources website.

7. Environmental management program

Clause 7

An environmental management program setting out the following—

  1. proposals for the disposal of any effluents, protection of groundwater and drainage and erosion control;.
  2. proposals for the suppression of noise, dust from any source and vibrations from blasting operations;.
  3. proposals for the effective monitoring of the operation.

 

7(a) proposals for the disposal of any effluents, protection of groundwater and drainage and erosion control

Proponents must include an environmental management program in their work plan. Guidance on Clause 7 sub clauses (a) to (c) above is provided below.

Effluents

The environmental management program must include proposals for the disposal of any effluents. The work plan should identify potential effluents and discuss how these will be managed.

Effluent is wastewater that is contaminated. The proponent should contact the EPA if they will be discharging effluent to waterways, as they may require a licence to do so. EPA licence numbers must be included in the work plan.

The most common contaminant in quarry wastewater is silt in suspension.

Lightly silt-laden waste water (for example surface run off) can

be treated by holding the water in a dam(s) and allowing the silt to fall out of suspension (settle) within the dam as sediment. Heavily silt-laden wastewater from sand washing (slimes) requires considerable treatment. The overflow from these dams must remain on site unless the discharge is approved by the EPA.

Quarry waste water can contain other contaminants that are more difficult to remove (for example hydrocarbons or elevated levels of salt) and may require specialist treatment.

Refer to the Earth Resources's Environmental Guidelines Management of Water in Mines and Quarries: Victorian Legal and Policy Requirements for more guidance on water management.

Groundwater

The environmental management program must set out a proposal or proposals for how groundwater will be protected.

Groundwater is water beneath the earth’s surface that fills pores between porous media such as soil, rock, coal and sand. Groundwater may be in an aquifer. An aquifer is an underground bed or layer of permeable rock, sediment, or soil that yields water. If a quarry intersects an aquifer water will flow into the pit.

If groundwater will be intersected by a quarry, or if following work plan approval, a quarry operator finds groundwater entering the pit, the proponent should contact the relevant Rural Water Authority to discuss whether a licence is required.

If the proponent plans to use groundwater they must also contact the relevant Rural Water Authority. A licence will be required.

The work plan should discuss:

  • The depth to groundwater.
  • Whether the operation will intersect groundwater
  • If groundwater will be intersected, the direction of groundwater flow, groundwater quality and head.
  • Whether a licence has been obtained and the licence number.
  • Whether the operation will use groundwater, the proposed use volume per annum and whether a licence has been obtained.
Drainage

The environmental management program must include proposals for drainage control. This will be closely related to the discussion of disposal of effluents (described above).

Drainage control works can divert surface water away from extraction areas and control erosion. The environmental management plan should describe what works will be undertaken to control surface water on the site and how.

Where construction of a dam is proposed, other than for slimes and settling ponds, a licence may be required under the Water Act 1989. Refer to the DSE publication Water Act 1989: Guidelines for Mines and Quarries for more information. If the proponent believes that a licence may be required, they should contact the relevant Water Authority.

The Earth Resources’s Environmental Guideline Management of Water in Mines and Quarries: Victorian Legal and Policy Requirements provides guidance on water management.

Erosion control

The environmental management program must include proposals for controlling erosion.

The main type of erosion in quarries is caused by water flowing over permeable sediments, causing sediment to be carried away by the water. Doing the following will reduce erosion:

  • Reduce the velocity of water flow by making the slope less steep.
  • Make the surface that water flows over harder, for example lining channels with rock.

Structures may be as simple as earthen drains to direct the flow of water and ideally should be no steeper than 1 vertical in 100 horizontal and no flatter than 1 vertical in 200 horizontal.

Drains in soft sediments that are steeper than 1 vertical in 100 horizontal may require lining.

The EPA’s guideline Construction Techniques for Sediment Pollution Control provides additional information about erosion control.

Earth Resources's Environmental Guidelines Management of Water in Mines and Quarries: Victorian Legal and Policy Requirements provides guidance on water management.

7(b) proposals for the suppression of noise, dust from any source and vibrations from blasting operations

Noise

The environmental management program must include proposals for controlling noise from the operation.

For the Melbourne metropolitan region,2 noise limits are set out in the EPA’s State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Noise from Commerce, Industry and Trade) (often referred to as ‘N1’), which sets limits for noise from industry. The Explanatory Notes that accompany this Policy provide useful guidance.

The work plan should describe how noise emissions will be minimised and how impacts on neighbours will be managed.

An acoustic assessment of a proposed new extraction area will be required where the quarry operations have the potential to impact on a noise sensitive area. This should include:

  • Identification of the EPA noise limits for the operation This will include measurement of existing background noise levels in the vicinity of residential locations potentially exposed to noise from the proposed operation.
  • Prediction of noise levels at all potentially affected noise sensitive areas, taking weather conditions into account. This may require taking noise measurements of mobile and fixed sources of noise at the existing quarry.
  • Assessment of the predicted noise levels in relation to the EPA noise limits.
  • Identification of noise control measures if the predicted noise levels exceed the guideline noise limits.
  • Design of a noise monitoring program – to be included in the environmental monitoring schedule (see clause 7(c)).

Proposals for the suppression of noise may include the following noise control measures:

  • Constructing a noise barrier (for example a bund) ideally close to the noise source or sensitive location.
  • Ensuring that internal combustion engines are enclosed and fitted with appropriate mufflers.
  • Enclosing plant.
  • Selecting the quietest option when purchasing equipment.
  • Replacing internal combustion engines with electric motors.
  • Using low frequency reversing beepers.

For areas outside the Melbourne metropolitan region, refer to the EPA draft guidelines, Noise from Industry in Regional Victoria (NIRV) Draft Guideline.

Dust

The environmental management program must explain how dust from any source at the operation will be controlled. Operators should aim to prevent any dust from leaving the site.

Proposals for the suppression of dust may include the following techniques:

  • Constructing wind breaks.
  • Using water sprays in processing.
  • Seeding surfaces that may generate dust that are not going to be used for some time, for example topsoil stockpiles.
  • Enclosing processing plant.
  • Using a water truck on roads.
  • Using chemical additives on roads, hard stand areas and in processing.

The EPA’s State Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality Management) requires air emissions to be controlled. The EPA’s Protocol for Environmental Management: Mining and Extractive Industries supports interpretation of the SEPP and sets out the requirements for the assessment and management of air emissions from activities undertaken in the operation of quarries. Proponents should read this protocol before preparing their work plan.

Dust monitoring will be required for many quarries (see clause 7(c) below).

Vibration from blasting

If blasting is proposed, the environmental management program should discuss potential impacts, regulatory requirements, proposed controls and monitoring.

Vibrations from blasting can transmit through the air (airblast vibration) and the ground (ground vibration).

Earth Resources's requirements are as follows:

Airblast vibration requirements

The work authority holder must ensure that the airblast overpressure from blasting operations, as measured in the vicinity of any sensitive location, is in accordance with AS2187.2:2006 Explosives – Storage and Use – Use of Explosives.

That is, does not exceed 115 dB(L) on more than 5% of blasts fired in a 12 month period, and 120 dB(L) at any time.

Ground vibration requirements

The work authority holder must ensure that the peak particle velocity resulting from blasting operations, as measured in the vicinity of any sensitive location, is in accordance with AS2187.2:2006 Explosives – Storage and Use – Use of Explosives.

That is, does not exceed 5mm/s on more than 5% of blasts fired in a 12 month period and 10mm/s at any time.

Further information is available in the Earth Resources's  Environmental Guidelines: Ground Vibration and Airblast Limits for Blasting in Mines and Quarries.

If blasting is proposed at the site and there are noise sensitive areas nearby it may be necessary for the work plan to include a specialist blasting report prepared by a suitably qualified consultant to demonstrate that the blasting operations will comply with Earth Resources  requirements. The full blasting report should be included as an appendix to the work plan.

A summary of the blasting report should be included in the blasting section of the environmental management program.

Blast monitoring should also be included in the Environmental Monitoring Schedule (see clause 7(c) below).

7(c) proposals for the effective monitoring of the operation

The environmental management program must include proposals for the effective monitoring of the operation.

The proponent should describe how they intend to monitor the environmental impacts of the operation. It is recommended that proponents summarise this in an environmental monitoring schedule for the site. The steps to developing an environmental monitoring schedule are as follows:

  1. What is the impact that you want to measure? (For example noise impacts on neighbours).
    Note:
    • Not all of the parameters required to be included in the environmental management plan will necessarily be required in the environmental monitoring schedule.
    • Some issues to be investigated may be determined by regulatory requirements of another Department/Agency.
    • Best practice environmental management and community engagement would see the proponent speaking with neighbouring land holders about the issues that concern them and incorporating this information into the selection of issues.
  2. What data will give you this information? What will you measure. (For example noise monitoring, measure sound pressure level in dB(A)).
  3. How frequently will the data need to be collected? (For example for noise, continuously or periodically).
  4. How will this data be collected? (What equipment will be used? Who will do it? How will you ensure that monitoring equipment is calibrated?).

The environmental monitoring schedule will include:

  • The reasons for including each parameter
  • Monitoring location(s)
  • Frequency of monitoring
  • Monitoring technique
  • The acceptable limit for the parameter.

Appendix 3.5 contains an example of an environmental monitoring schedule. Note that this is an example only, and the number of monitoring points for a particular quarry will obviously be site-specific.

Other issues for the Environmental Management Program

Other issues may need to be addressed in the environmental management program because they are relevant to the site and or are required by other legislation. These could include but are not limited to:

  • Fire preparedness
  • Waste minimisation, recycling and disposal (for example oils, sewage, scrap metal, non-industrial wastes)
  • Pest animal and plant control program.

8. Rehabilitation plan

Clause 8

A rehabilitation plan that complies with section 79 of the Act and sets out the following— 

  1. the concepts for the possible end use of the site;
  2. the proposals for the progressive rehabilitation to a safe and stable landform of extraction areas including slope batters, road cuttings and dumps;
  3. the proposals for landscaping to minimise the visual impact of the site;
  4. any proposals to protect and conserve native vegetation during the production phase of the operation;
  5. any proposals for the final rehabilitation and vegetation of the site including final security of the site, securing water dams and slimes dams and removal of plant and equipment.

 

A proponent must include a rehabilitation plan in their work plan.

The rehabilitation plan should include text and drawings. The drawings should include a plan view and cross-sections. The drawings should:

  • Be at an appropriate scale.
  • Show work authority boundaries and final pit extraction limits.
  • Show stages of progressive rehabilitation if this has not been shown on the site plan – refer to clause 4.
  • Clearly depict the final rehabilitated landform after extraction has ceased.
  • Include cross-sections of the extraction area that show progressive rehabilitation and the final rehabilitated landform.

If the proponent of the extractive industry is not the landowner, the proponent should discuss the rehabilitation plan with the landowner. For large sites and sites with communities close by, the proponent should discuss rehabilitation with community members.

Appendix 3.6 includes an example of a rehabilitation plan drawing (which does not include all of the above features).

8(a) the concepts for the possible end use of the site

The rehabilitation plan should describe the intended end use of the site. Examples of end uses are agricultural land, residential development, lakes, sports ovals, other park or recreational facilities, bushland, landfill or recycling facilities.

8(b) the proposals for the progressive rehabilitation to a safe and stable landform of extraction areas including slope batters, road cuttings and dumps

Rehabilitation of the site should occur on a progressive basis. This requires extracted areas to be rehabilitated while extraction moves to another area.

The rehabilitation plan must include proposals for how extraction areas, including slope batters, road cuttings and dumps, will be progressively rehabilitated to a safe and stable landform. As mentioned above, this may be depicted on the development plan, or on a separate plan.

The safe and stable landform will be consistent with the concepts for the intended end use of the site (clause 8(a) above) and the proposals for the final rehabilitation of the site (clause 8(e) below).

As a guide, a safe and stable rehabilitated slope in erodible strata (ie not hard rock) should be no steeper than 1 vertical: 3 horizontal.

8(c) the proposals for landscaping to minimise the visual impact of the site

The rehabilitation plan must include proposals for landscaping to minimise the visual impact of the site. This should specify the landscaping proposed to improve the appearance of the site both during operation and for the final landform after operation.

The main landscaping techniques are using vegetation and re-shaping landforms.

Vegetation

Native vegetation can be planted to visually screen the site during operations and post operations. See clause 8(d) below for more information about native vegetation.

Catchment Management Authorities, DSE biodiversity staff and community members can provide guidance on indigenous species that grow well in your area. DSE has divided Victoria into Ecological Vegetation Classes based on what vegetation is indigenous (naturally occurring). DSE can provide advice on what Ecological Vegetation Class (EVC) the proponent’s site falls under and provide guidance on what should be planted consistent with this EVC. A proponent could request input from DSE as part of the work plan referral process.

An example for a site where acacias (wattle) and eucalypts are indigenous: Fast growing species like acacias can provide screening in the short to medium term (up to 15 years). Species with longer life expectancy such as eucalypts can provide screening in the longer term.

A proposal could be to plant a mixture of acacias, eucalypts and an understory of shrubs and grasses. The acacias would provide screening during the operation’s production phase, with the eucalypts providing long-term screening and revegetation.

Re-shaping landforms

Earth moving equipment can be used to construct bunds around the perimeter of the operations to screen the operations from the outside. The final landform will be visually more appealing if the contours are consistent with the surrounding natural landform. A slope should be no steeper than 1 vertical: 3 horizontal.

8(d) any proposals to protect and conserve native vegetation during the production phase of the operation

If native vegetation is present on the site, the rehabilitation plan must describe how native vegetation will be protected during the production phase of the operation.

Proponents must comply with the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988.

DEPI's publication Native Vegetation Management: a Framework for Action (‘the Framework’) must also be followed. The DEPI's guidance document Native Vegetation Guide for the Earth Resources Industries, explains how this applies to the extractive industry. The Framework requires this hierarchy to be followed:

  • Avoid
  • Minimise
  • Offset.

An offset management plan will be required where native vegetation is cleared.

Native vegetation that is not authorised to be cleared must be protected while the extractive industry is in operation. It is recommended that the work plan includes the following activities where practical:

  • Identify native vegetation (prior to extraction, during extraction and after rehabilitation).
  • Consider fencing and signage of native vegetation to ensure its protection.
  • Avoid disturbing the root zone of a tree, which generally extends to the edge of the canopy plus half the radius of the canopy again.
  • Identify opportunities for native seed collection and propagation.
  • Implement a weed control program.

8(e) any proposals for the final rehabilitation and vegetation of the site including final security of the site, securing water dams and slimes dams and removal of plant and equipment

The rehabilitation plan must include a proposal for the final rehabilitation and vegetation of the site. This should include any works required to achieve final security of the site, for example, securing water dams, rehabilitation of slimes dams and removal of plant and equipment.

The plan should also identify revegetation closure criteria. This would identify what would constitute successful revegetation of the site. For example 90 % of seedlings have survived two summers.

The rehabilitation plan should consider whether the rehabilitation will require ongoing maintenance and if so, what resources this would require and who would be responsible for it.

9. Community facilities affected

Clause 9

A description of any significant community facilities that may be affected by the proposed works.

 

The work plan must include a description of any significant community facilities that may be affected by the proposed works.

Some examples of community facilities are:

  • Public buildings such as halls, community centres, libraries etc
  • Schools, hospitals and similar facilities for the care of members of the community
  • Places of worship
  • Facilities or structures associated with public sporting venues
  • Parks, gardens, recreation reserves and other places used for recreational purposes by the public
  • Places of local cultural or historical significance.

The proponent should describe in words what the community facility is and how it may be affected by the proposed quarry. The proponent should also include the location of the facility(s) on the regional plan (see clause 3).

10. Community engagement plan

Clause 10

A community engagement plan that –

  1. identifies any community likely to be affected by extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority; and
  2. includes proposals, in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority, for –

    • identifying community attitudes and expectations; and
    • providing information to the community; and
    • receiving feedback from the community; and
    • analysing community feedback and considering community concerns or expectations; and
  3. includes a proposal for registering, documenting and responding to complaints and other communications from members of the community in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority.

 

The work plan must include a community engagement plan that contains all of the information listed in clause 10.

The proponent should refer to the Earth Resources's Community Engagement Guidelines for Mining and Mineral Exploration in Victoria for guidance on how to prepare a community engagement plan.3 Earth Resources has also produced an on-line Community Engagement Plan ‘template’ that enables proponents to prepare and download their own community engagement plan. The template addresses the requirements of clause 10 and can be submitted with the work plan.

Note that this ‘template’ is a minimum standard for a community engagement plan and a higher level of engagement with the community is encouraged.

Part 4: Work plan variations

This Part provides guidance on work plan variation processes.

Writing the work plan with flexibility in mind will reduce the need for work plan variations. However the work plan must still meet the requirements of Schedule 1 of the Regulations and be specific enough to clearly describe the quarry establishment, operation and rehabilitation.

How are work plan variations initiated?

There are two ways that a work plan variation can be initiated:

  • The holder of a work authority applies to Earth Resources  for a variation of their work plan and Earth Resources  approves the variation, or
  • The Department Head (or delegate) directs the work authority holder to submit an application to  Earth Resources  for a variation of their work plan and Earth Resources  approves the variation.

If a proponent is unsure whether a work plan variation is required, they should discuss this with the Earth Resources.

When is a work plan variation needed?

Whether or not a work plan variation is required is a discretion held by Earth Resources. The following information is a guide as to how this discretion may be exercised.

A work plan variation may be required when:  

1. The proposed work is not covered by the current work plan; and

2. One or more of the following apply:

The proposed work:

  1. Requires a form of approval under another Act, such as the: 
    •      
    • Planning and Environment Act 1987     
    • Environment Effects Act 1978     
    • Environment Protection Act 1970     
    • Water Act 1989     
    • Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988     
    • Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006     
    • Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994     
    • Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth)     
    • Native Title Act 1993 (Cth)
  2. Requires the removal, destruction or lopping of additional native vegetation and an assessment is required under Victoria’s Native Vegetation Management – a Framework of Action 2002.
  3. Will have an impact on the environment and or community.
  4. Requires major amendment of the approved environmental management program and or rehabilitation plan.
  5. Will result in an increase in rehabilitation liability of 10% or $50,000 over the current assessment

Examples

Examples of where a work plan variation has been required include:

  • Changes to the extraction limit 
  • Changes to batter angles 
  • Clearing of native vegetation 
  • The work plan is very old and does not meet the requirements of Schedule 1 
  • Introduction of blasting.

Appendix 1: The work authority application process

Stage one: work plan approval

Initial contact with department

Contact a Earth Resources  inspector to organise site meeting (send inspector site map/location to enable inspector to meet proponent)

       

Down arrow

Site meeting with inspector

Site meeting with inspector and other relevant agencies to discuss proposal

Receive copy of the Extractive Industry Work Plan Guideline (‘the guideline’) (this document)

Following this meeting Earth Resources  sends a letter to the applicant with a proposal number

       

Down arrow

Draft work plan

Submit draft work plan to inspector based on inspector’s comments and information provided in the guideline

Re-submit draft work plan (if required to do so) for assessment by inspector

       

Down arrow

Endorsed work plan

Once acceptable, inspector will endorse work plan and send to proponent

Receive notification of rehabilitation bond assessment – do NOT submit bond at this stage

Apply for planning permit; send planning permit application to Earth Resources  on the same day.

Start compiling information required for “information package” (see below)

       

Down arrow

“Information Package” required to obtain approved work plan

  • Land owner’s consent – for private land
  • Land manager’s consent (for Crown land) – native title issues may need to be addressed
  • Other consents may be required (easement, EL/MIN holder etc…)
  • Current public liability insurance
  • Three copies of endorsed work plan
  • Fee for lodging a work plan
  • An additional fee is required to approve (grant) a work authority – you may wish to submit this fee at the same time.
  • Please be aware that the relevant fees are based on the size and depth of your operation. For assistance contact your Earth Resources tenements officer.
  • Planning Permit
  • (Go to “approved work plan” stage once all information obtained)

       

Down arrow

Approved work plan

Earth Resources receives all items required in Information Package including planning permit (see below)

Earth Resources approves (endorsed work plan & bond assessment)

Earth Resources  forwards to proponent Work Authority Application Form for completion

Go to stage 2…

       

Down arrow

Stage two: work authority application and grant

Lodge Application

Complete and submit Work Authority Application Form

Submit required bond (in the form of a bank guarantee) (Section 80 of the Act)

Submit fee to approve a work authority

Submit index map

       

Down arrow

Granted work authority

Work authority granted

Department forwards work authority document, approved work plan and work plan conditions

The department wishes you every success with your operation

Appendix 2: Earth Resources  contact details

Ballarat

Earth Resources Regulation Branch
State Offices
Corner Mair and Doveton Streets
BALLARAT VIC 3350
Ph: 03 5336 6802
F ax: 03 5336 6800

Bendigo

Earth Resources Regulation Branch
Corner of Midland Hwy & Taylor Street
EPSOM VIC 3551
Bendigo Mail Centre
BENDIGO VIC 3554
Ph: 03 5430 4692
Fax: 03 5430 4304

Benalla

Earth Resources Regulation Branch
89 Sydney Road PO Box 124
BENALLA VIC 3672
Ph: 03 5761 1501
Fax: 03 5761 1628

Melbourne

Earth Resources Information Centre
Level 15, 1 Spring Street
VIC 3000
Ph: 1300 366 356

Traralgon

Earth Resources Regulation Branch
55 Grey Street
TRARALGON VIC 3844
Ph: 03 5160 9011
Fax: 03 5160 9055

Appendix 3.1: Schedule 1 of the Mineral Resources (Sustainable Development) (Extractive Industries) Regulations 2010

Regulations 5, 7, 13 and 14

Part 1— Work plan information

  1. A general description of the geological information of the location including estimates of stone resources.
  2. A general location plan at a scale of 1:100 000 or 1: 50 000.
  3. A regional plan at a scale of 1:25 000 showing the extent of Crown lands, private lands, private land allotments, rivers and streams within the proposed work plan area and, where possible, parks and reserves within 2 kilometres of the site. Copies of certificates of title must also be submitted with respect to any private land allotments.
  4. A site plan at an appropriate scale including cross-sections, showing and describing existing surface contours and topographical features, drainage patterns, water courses, vegetation features and soil information and also including the following— 

    a. the surface facilities including the proposed location of buildings and the location of crushing, screening and other processing plant;

    b. the anticipated extent of extraction with proposed bench heights, berm details and working batters;

    c. the sequencing of extraction;

    d. the location of topsoil and waste rock dumps and stockpile areas;

    e. the location of proposed water dams, any slimes dams and sediment retention systems and any measures for the diversion of water from the site;

    f. access roads.

  5. Description of processing methods to be used including the proposed plant layout.
  6. If the general location plan includes a declared quarry, the quarry stability requirements set out in Part 2.
  7. An environmental management program setting out the following—

    a. proposals for the disposal of any effluents, protection of groundwater and drainage and erosion control;

    b. proposals for the suppression of noise, dust from any source and vibrations from blasting operations;

    c. proposals for the effective monitoring of the operation.

  8. A rehabilitation plan that complies with section 79 of the Act and sets out the following—

    a. the concepts for the possible end use of the site;

    b. the proposals for the progressive rehabilitation to a safe and stable landform of extraction areas including slope batters, road cuttings and dumps;

    c. the proposals for landscaping to minimise the visual impact of the site;

    d. any proposals to protect and conserve native vegetation during the production phase of the operation;

    e. any proposals for the final rehabilitation and vegetation of the site including final security of the site, securing water dams and slimes dams and removal of plant and equipment.

  9. A description of any significant community facilities that may be affected by the proposed works.
  10. A community engagement plan that—

a. identifies any community likely to be affected by extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority; and

b. includes proposals, in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority, for—

i. identifying community attitudes and expectations; and

ii. providing information to the community; and

iii. receiving feedback from the community; and

iv. analysing community feedback and considering community concerns or expectations; and

c. includes a proposal for registering, documenting and responding to complaints and other communications from members of the community in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority.

Part 2 — Declared quarry stability information

  1. A description of the geological information that is relevant to the stability of the declared quarry and any variation of the geological information across the rest of the location plan, including a plan showing cross sections and long sections of the proposed extraction area of the declared quarry.
  2. If a work plan was approved before the quarry became a declared quarry—

    a. a description of any proposed changes to the information under item 4 of Part 1;

    b. a description of any infrastructure or plant proposed to be associated with the declared quarry.

  3. An assessment of the geotechnical and hydrogeological risks for the declared quarry.
  4. A description of the controls that will be implemented to eliminate or reduce the geotechnical and hydrogeological risks to an acceptable level including—

    a. a description of any proposed groundwater control system; and

    b. particulars of other measures to ensure the stability of the quarry, associated infrastructure and adjacent land.

  5. A plan for monitoring the stability and groundwater management of the declared quarry
  6. A description of the process for reviews of the assessment, plan, actions and controls referred to in this Part relating to the declared quarry.

Appendix 3.2: Example of a general location plan

Example of a general location plan, a scanned page from the VicRoads State Directory

Appendix 3.3: Example of a regional plan

Example of a regional plan, a map showing the local area with the quarry site marked

Appendix 3.4: Example of a site plan and cross sections

Example of a site plan and cross sections showing staged extractionExample of a cross section plan

Appendix 3.5: Example of an environmental monitoring schedule

Table 1. Water

Location Rationale Frequency Parameters (to be determined in discussion with Earth Resources Regulation)
Discharge point: At discharge pipe from pond Measurement of discharge water at compliance point Weekly pH, temperature, conductivity, turbidity, visible oil
Monthly As above
Quarterly As above
Upstream of discharge point Measurement of background water Weekly As for discharge point
Monthly As for discharge point
Quarterly As for discharge point
Downstream of discharge point Measurement of (potentially) affected water Weekly As for discharge point
Monthly As for discharge point
Quarterly As for discharge point
Groundwater bore: #1 and #2 Measurement of any seepage from tailings dam Weekly Water level, pH, temperature, electrical conductivity and turbidity
Monthly As for discharge point
Quarterly As for discharge point
Tailings dam #1 Measurement of water quality for recirculation Daily pH, temperature, electrical conductivity
Weekly As for discharge point (monthly)
Monthly As for discharge point (quarterly)

Table 2. Noise

Location Rationale Frequency Parameters
Eastern boundary point 1 Near school Monthly EPA, SEPP (Control of noise from Commerce, Industry & Trade) N-1 OR Noise from Industry in Regional Victoria (NIRV) – Draft Guideline
Quarterly As above
Western corner Near playing fields Monthly As above
Quarterly As above
Resident in Greta Road Nearest residence As required Work plan conditions

Table 3. Blasting

Location Rationale Frequency Parameters (to be determined in discussion with Earth Resources Regulation)
Resident in Greta Road Nearest residence All blasts 115dB (lineal peak), 5mm/sec
Eastern boundary point 1 Near school Every third blast 115dB (lineal peak), 5mm/sec

Table 4. Dust

Location Rationale Frequency
Parameters
Eastern boundary point 1 Near school Continuous Deposited dust (mg/m2/month)
High volume dust (mg/m3)
Western corner Near playing fields Monthly Deposited dust (mg/m2/month)
Resident in Greta Road Nearest residence Monthly Deposited dust (mg/m2/month)

Table 5. Weeds

Location Rationale Frequency Parameters
Entire Site Progressive Rehabilitation Stages 1 – 3 Control spread off-site To ensure compliance with work plan conditions Seasonally Minimum twice yearly Twice yearly Work plan conditions Catchment and Land Protection Act 1994 Work plan conditions

Appendix 3.6: Example of a rehabilitation plan

Example of a rehabilitation plan

Example showing possible dry terminal face rehabilitation (Sand & Gravel Pit) and Possible wet terminal face rehabilitation (Sand & Gravel Pit)

Appendix 4: Glossary of terms

Batter: The face of the slope.

Bench: The part of the quarry where material is loaded and hauled away.

Berm: A small earthen windrow constructed beside the edge of the bench to prevent mobile equipment from falling over the bench edge.

Bond: An amount of money, usually in the form of a bank guarantee, which is forfeited if the rehabilitation of a site is not successfully completed in the allocated time or to an acceptable standard.

Buffer zone: An area of the site which is unavailable for extraction. Its purpose is to reduce the impact of the site on neighbouring properties. Such impacts may be visual, noise, dust or vibration. Buffer zones may extend to hundreds of metres in width.

Cross sections: Drawings that illustrate an area of the site in the vertical dimension.

Crown land : Crown land is managed by the Government. The type of Crown land, for example National Park or State Forest, will determine which government department/division will be the manager.

Dewatering: Removing water from the extraction area to enable extraction to continue.

Endorsed work plan: The Earth Resources Regulation Branch endorses the draft work plan as having sufficient technical merit to support a planning permit application. The endorsement is given after agreement is received from the relevant referral agencies.Grab samples: Small amounts of material taken for analysis.

Haul roads: Roads on site that mobile equipment travels on.

Magazine: A place where explosives are stored.

Native vegetation: Plants that are indigenous to Victoria, including trees, shrubs, herbs and grasses.

Overburden: Waste material extracted in order to access stone.

Rehabilitation: Restoration of the site to an acceptable stable land form.

Retention pond: A dam for holding water.Site: The area of land covered by the work authority.

Slimes dam: A dam that contains small fractions of plant by-product, usually in the form of slurry.

Terminal face: The face of a quarry or mine when extraction has finished but rehabilitation works have not commenced.

Topsoil: This is usually the surface material to a minimum of 150mm in depth.

Work authority: Means a work authority granted under section 77I of the Mineral Resources (Sustainable Development) Act 1990.

Work plan: Means a work plan lodged under section 77G of the Mineral Resources (Sustainable Development) Act 1990.

Appendix 5: Example of a work plan structure

The following is an example of the structure of a work plan. Cross references to the requirements of the Schedule are included in brackets.

Background

Site locality description

Existing controls

Anticipated impacts of development

Resource description (Clause 1)

Resource assessment

Reserve estimates

Soil and overburden estimates

Geotechnical regime

Markets

Markets available

Estimated annual output

Site and access details

Title and Easements description

Site security

Access to site

Internal access

Buffer zones

Topsoil and overburden storage

Infrastructure (Clause 5)

Fixed plant

Mobile plant

Power supply

Fuel storage

Water supply

Operations (Clause 7)

Operating hours

Extraction operations

Extraction staging

Working faces

Terminal faces

Haul roads

Explosives use and storage

Surface water

Erosion control (Clause 7(a))

Processing operations (Clause 5)

Environmental Management Program (Clause 7)

Native vegetation and fauna

Net gain and offset management plan

Operational noise (Clause 7(b) – proposals for suppression of noise)

Internal noise (Clause 7(b) – proposals for suppression of noise)

Air blast and ground vibrations (Clause 7(b) – proposals for suppression of blasting operations)

Air quality (Clause 7(b) – proposals for suppression of dust from any source)

Surface water (Clause 7(a) – drainage)

Groundwater (Clause 7(a))

Acid waterEffluent control (Clause 7(a) – effluent disposal)

Other waste productsVermin and noxious weeds

Cultural heritageVisual amenity

Fire fighting preparedness

Summarised environmental management plan

Rehabilitation Plan (Clause 8)

Progressive rehabilitation (Clause 8(b))

Terminal face treatment

Rehabilitation planting

Rehabilitation maintenance

End use (Clause 8(a))

Community facilities impacted (Clause 9)

Community facilities include community resources such as sports ovals and other public open space

A statement of whether, what and how community facilities may be affected by the proposal

Community Engagement Plan (Clause 10)

Appendices

Land title – from the title registry

Planning permit – from council

Geotechnical review

Blasting review

Drainage and water quality management

Native vegetation net gain review

Operational noise review

Air quality reviewGroundwater review

Cultural heritage statutory obligations

Figures

General location plan (Clause 2)

Regional plan (Clause 3)

Site plan (Clause 4; Clause 5 and Clause 8). To assist in meeting the requirements of Clause 5, the Site Plan should show the proposed plant layout

Work authority area plan

Development plan

Rehabilitation plan – showing final landform (Clause 8)

Appendix 6: Work plan checklist

1. Geological information

Description of geological information

Estimate of stone resources

 

2. General location plan

Scale of 1:100 000 or 1:50 000

North direction is shown

Scale is shown

Drawing has a title “location plan”

Dates of original drawing and last revision are shown

 

3. Regional plan

Scale is 1:25 000

North direction is shown

Scale is shown

Drawing has title “regional plan”

Dates of original drawing and last revision are shown

Crown land within the proposed work plan area is shown

Private land and private land allotments within the proposed work plan area are shown

Rivers and streams within the proposed work plan area are shown

Parks and reserves within 2 km of the proposed work plan area are shown

Copies of certificates of title for private land allotments

 

4. Site plan

North direction is shown

Scale is shown

Scale is appropriate.

Drawing has title “site plan”

Dates of original drawing and last revision are shown

Surface contours are shown and described

Topographical features are shown and described

Drainage patterns are shown and described

Water courses are shown and described

Vegetation features are shown and described

Soil information is shown and described

Surface facilities including the proposed location of buildings and the location of crushing, screening and other processing plant are shown

The anticipated extent of extraction with proposed bench heights, berm details and working batters is shown

The sequencing of extraction is shown

The location of topsoil stockpiles is shown

The location of overburden dumps is shown

The location of proposed water dams, slimes dams or sediment retention systems and any measures for the diversion of water from the site are shown

Access roads are shown

 

5. Description of processing methods

Processing methods, including proposed plant layout are described

 

6. Stability requirements

If the quarry is “declared” by the Minister, the stability requirements in Part 2 of the Schedule are included

 

7. Environmental management program

Proposals for the disposal of effluents are included

Proposals for the protection of groundwater are included

Proposals for drainage and erosion control are included

Proposals for the suppression of noise are included

Proposals for the suppression of dust from any source are included

Proposals for the suppression of vibration from blasting operations are included

A proposal for the effective monitoring of the operation is included

 

8. Rehabilitation plan

Concepts for the possible end use of the site are described

Proposals for progressive rehabilitation to a safe and stable landform of extraction areas including slope batters, road cuttings and dumps are included

Proposals for landscaping to minimise the visual impact of the site are included

Proposals to protect and conserve native vegetation during the production phase of the operation are included

Proposals for the final rehabilitation and vegetation of the site including final security of the site, securing water dams and slimes dams and removal of plant and equipment are included

 

9. Community facilities

Significant community facilities that may be affected by the proposed works are described

 

10. Community engagement plan

Any community likely to be affected by extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority is identified

Proposals for identifying community attitudes and expectations in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority are included

Proposals for providing information to the community in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority are include

Proposals for receiving feedback from the community in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority are included

Proposals for analysing community feedback and considering community concerns or expectations in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority are included

A proposal for registering, documenting and responding to complaints and other communications from members of the community in relation to extractive industry activities authorised by the extractive industry work authority is included

 

Appendix 7: Additional resources

Department documents and resources:

Community Engagement: Guidelines for Mining and Mineral Exploration in Victoria

Community Engagement Plan Template

Code of Practice for Small Quarries

Environmental Guidelines: Management of Water in Mines and Quarries: Victorian Legal and Policy Requirements

Environmental Guidelines: Ground Vibration and Airblast Limits for Blasting in Mines and Quarries

GeoVic

Management of Tailings Storage Facilities

Management of Small Tailings Storage Facilities

Native Vegetation Management Guide for the Earth Resources Industries

EPA documents:

Construction Techniques for Sediment Pollution Control
Available on the EPA website (PDF document)

Draft guideline on statutory approvals relating to noise
http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/your-environment/noise/commercial-and-industrial-noise

Noise from Industry in Regional Victoria (NIRV) – Draft Guideline
http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/your-environment/noise/commercial-and-industrial-noise

State Environment Protection Policy (Groundwaters of Victoria)
http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/about-us/legislation/land-and-groundwater-legislation

State Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality Management)
http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/about-us/legislation/air-legislation

State Environment Protection Policy (Air Quality Management) Protocol for Environmental Management – Mining and Extractive Industries)
http://epanote2.epa.vic.gov.au/EPA%5Cpublications.nsf/PubDocsLU/1191?OpenDocument

State Environment Protection Policy (Control of Noise from Commerce, Industry and Trade)
No N-1.

http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/your-environment/noise/commercial-and-industrial-noise

Other documents and resources:

Victoria Government Gazette
http://www.gazette.vic.gov.au/

Victorian Government Legislation Website
http://www.legislation.vic.gov.au (go to Victorian Law Today)

Water Act 1989: Guidelines for Mines and Quarries
Water Act Guideline


1There are a number of other exemptions that apply. These are all listed in the most recent Government Gazette. At the time of publication this was Special Gazette Number 439 dated 29 December 2009. The Gazette can be found on the Victorian Government Gazette website.

2 Which includes much of, but not all of, the current greater Melbourne area. This area is not the same as the Earth Resources Melbourne District inspectorate. 

3 While the Guideline refers to mining rather than extractive operations, the legislative requirements for the community engagement plan are the same.

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Customer Service Centre on 136 186, TTY 1800 122 969,

Published by the Department of State Development, Business and Innovation Earth Resources Regulation Branch. September 2010.

© The State of Victoria 2010.This publication is copyright. No part may be reproduced by any process except in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright Act 1968.

Authorised by the Department of State Development, Business and Innovation - ISBN: 978-1-74264-411-0 (online)

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